Penis Health and Medication Side Effects – Important Tips for Penis Care

Advances in medical treatment have vastly improved the health of many people, but can medication reactions have an adverse impact on penis health? The fact is that every medication has the potential to cause side effects, and sometimes, those reactions may have an impact on a man’s penis in one way or another. The risk of side effects can vary enormously from one medication to another, as well as from one man to another, so the possibility of a manhood-related side effect by itself does not mean a man should avoid a prescribed medication; however, in order to maintain an appropriate level of penis care, men should be aware if a particular medication has the potential to impact his organ. That knowledge will enable a man to make better, more informed decisions concerning his health.

Side effects

The following is a list of side effects that can have an impact on penis health; while there are more possible side effects, this list provides a good overview of what to be on the lookout for.

1) Erectile dysfunction. Let’s be honest: this is the side effect that most men are worried about – and why not? Men like sex and don’t want anything to interfere with one of their favorite pastimes. There are quite a few medications that can possibly contribute to erectile dysfunction in the form of weaker erections, less durable erections or outright impotence. Again, however, it’s important to remember that this is only a potential side effect: the actual incidence may be very low.

Among the classes of medications that are associated with possible erectile dysfunction are blood pressure medications, antihistamines and antidepressants. When talking about blood pressure treatments, some “sub-groups” are more likely to cause erectile dysfunction than others; these include diuretics and beta blockers. Much less associated with erectile issues are ACE inhibitors, alpha blockers, calcium channel blockers and ARBs.

2) Urinary incontinence. This is another side effect of concern: not having proper control of the bladder is not only inconvenient, but it also can be quite embarrassing. Among the medications that may cause urinary incontinence are diuretics, antihistamines, sedatives and antidepressants. Two classes of high blood pressure medicines, calcium channel blockers and alpha blockers, are also on the list.

3) Skin issues. Skin reactions are a potential side effect of almost any medication – although even in medications that are considered most likely to cause these reactions, the incidence rate is typically no higher than 5%. It’s also worth noting that most often, these skin reactions occur elsewhere on the body than the penis. The classes of medications with the highest incidence of skin reactions are certain anti-inflammatory medications, antibiotics and anti-epileptics.

4) Priapism. A persistent and painful erection lasting four hours or longer is considered priapism. Although the concept of a “long lasting” erection is appealing, in practice priapism can cause serious damage to the organ. Among the classes of medications which may have priapic side effects are antidepressants, antipsychotics, anticoagulants and hormones. The FDA recently issued an advisory that some ADHD treatments containing methylphenidate have been associated with instances of priapism.

5) Penis curvature. Penis curvature is a fairly rare side effect, but it has been reported in some users of beta blockers. At least one study associates it as a possible side effect of one medication used to treat erectile dysfunction.

Health and Medical Advice on the Internet: Use it Wisely to Overcome Illness and Find More Happiness

I’ve got a bit of a problem with depression and anxiety. I’ve been tackling these problems for several years without the use of modern medicine. Tai Chi, meditation, martial arts (exercise), and positive interaction with other people seem to keep a lid on my illnesses most of the time. I don’t like the idea of medication’s side effects, and I don’t believe the answers in life are often found in the easy path (E.G. taking a pill), but rather on the hard path of effort and determination. This is not to say that I don’t feel medicine is not effective, not at all, I just feel all the options should be looked at before making big decisions to do with one’s health.

Health of body and mind has always been one of the most important issues in life for us humans. Seeing a doctor is usually the best option when one comes down with an illness or ailment, but people have always tried alternative routes to recovery: E. G. the ‘home doctor’ books of old. Maybe you don’t like sitting in a room waiting with a bunch of other sick people-you might catch something there! You could be housebound, or maybe you feel like hearing several opinions as you’ve found past experiences with some doctors have been tainted by poor judgments. Well, the Internet is here with a multitude of options to help you get better.

Medical advice and data abounds on this household tool in the form of self-help sites, searchable medical encyclopedias, support groups, live chats with doctors, and you can even have professional consultations on-line (for a fee). My advice is to just be wary of the type of language that the site is expressing. Many sites will have extensive lists telling you of all the symptoms in the Universe: everybody on Earth could be construed as being ill in some way! This can cause people with a propensity for hypochondria to start diagnosing themselves with all sorts of diseases. In my case, reading about all the symptoms of depression actually made me feel more depressed as it made me focus on my weaknesses (without too many optimistic perspectives or treatments expressed on some sites).

Look for sites that look at things in a positive light. Maybe search out some alternative therapies as well so you can get all the possible different approaches that can be taken to tackle your illness. Some websites can be very helpful with interactive features like ‘Ask the doctor”, on-line questionnaires, and question and answer archives that give you an idea of what others have asked and the solutions they were presented with. There is heaps of information on both prescription and over-the counter medicines so you can make your choices in an informed manner. You can often find information specific to groups, like children, the elderly, men and women.

Just remember your body is your temple and you must be wary of many variables not often foretold in literature. Beware of medicines from other countries as they may be different or have different names. Keep in mind only you know your personal history, all people are different, and always get several opinions. Watch out for sites with grandiose claims as miracles come from higher powers and not from companies who might just want to get rich quick!

I do acknowledge the fitness and diet sites as being very useful as well. You can devise your own fitness plan derived from lifestyle information, and forums and newsgroups give you many opinions on which road to take. You can have your diet analyzed by on-line trainers, some of which send free newsletters and even send you emails of encouragement to help you towards your goal.

So, there’s a whole new world of on-line health advice and information for humanity to access right from home. Get all your options and remember your attitude is often the first real step to overcoming physical, mental, and spiritual adversity!

Health and Medical Insurance – Comparing Managed Care Health Plans

Health insurance plans have been forced to take action to contain costs of quality health care delivery as health care costs have skyrocketed. Health insurance premiums, deductibles and co-pays have steadily increased, and health insurance companies have implemented certain strategies for reducing health care costs. “Managed care” describes a group of stratgies aimed at reducing the costs of health care for health insurance companies.

There are two basic types of managed care plans; health maintenance organizations, or HMOs, and preferred provider organizations, or PPOs. So which health plan is best? How do you choose what type of health insurance best suits the health care needs of you and your family?

Both HMOs and PPOs contain costs by contracting with health providers for reduced rate on health care services for its’ members, often as much as 60%. One important difference between HMOs and PPOs is that PPOs often will cover the costs of care when the provider is out of their network, but usually at a reduced rate. On the other hand, most HMOs offer no coverage for health care services for out-of-network providers.

Both HMO and PPOs also control health care costs by use of a gateway, or primary care provider (PCP). Health insurance plan members are assigned (or select) a primary care practitioner (physician, physician assistant, or nurse practitioner). usually a family practitioner or internal medicine doctor for adult members or a pediatrician or family care practitioner for childern. The primary care provider is responsible for coordianting health delivery for plan members. Care by specialist physicians require referral from the primary care provider. This cost containment strategy is intended to avoid duplication of services (for example, the cardiologist ordering tests that have already been done by the PCP, or a sprained ankle being referred to an orthopedic) and avoid unnecessary specialist referrals, tests and/or procedures.

HMO and PPO plans also contain costs by requiring prior approval, prior authorization, or pre-certification for many elective hospital admissions, surgeries, costly tests and imaging procedures, durable medical equipment and prescription drugs. When such services are required, the provider must submit a request to the health insurance plan review department, along with medical records that justify the service. The request is reviewed by the health insurance company to determine whether the services are justified as “medically necessary” according to the health plan policy and guidelines. Review is usually performed by licensed nurses, and, if the reviewer agrees that the service is necessary, approval is given and the service will be covered by the health insurance plan.

As health care costs continue to rise, many indemnity health insurance plans, or “fee for service” plans are being forced to adopt some managed care strategies in order to provide quality health care and keep health insurance premiums affordable. And as long as health care costs continue to rise, the distinctions among PPO, HMO, FFS and other health insurance plans will become blurred. Rest assured, however, that managed health care is here to stay.

Mental Health and Medications or Meditation

It is up to you and your physician to determine if medication is right for you and always consult with your medical doctor before making any changes. I hope this article will give you a few things to think about and to discuss with your doctor.

Our world is filled with a quick fix for everything. If you have legs that are a little restless there is a pill, and if you feel a light blue, but not dark blue then there is a medication, and if you feel dark blue, there is a medication for that too. If you are not sleeping there is a pill and if you are oversleeping there is a pill. It seems like for every emotion, every tingle, every feeling, there is pretty much a medication for it. The bottom line is meditation can help with so many of these simple symptoms.

Many people wonder when to meditate and when to medicate. Well that is a fairly simple question to answer. People with a severe mental illness who do not seek medication are usually playing with a time bomb. Bi-polar, severe depression, schizophrenia all require medication for a person to maintain stability. Of course, some people can get by with herbal supplements and vitamins but most people with severe mental health diagnosis probably need medication along with meditation.

If you are a person that has mild to moderate depression or anxiety, or have insomnia then you are a great candidate for natural treatments and meditation would work well for you. Studies have concluded that meditation helps with insomnia, yet people with insomnia rarely use meditation, rather they are too busy trying to find a medication that can offer them sleep or complaining about how restless their sleep is. Yet, when asked if they meditate most of them say no.

Studies have also suggested that meditation helps with mild to moderate depression and anxiety. So if studies show that meditation help with insomnia, why are insomniacs not mediating? There is a variety of reason but the bottom line is, it takes time to create a habit and meditation takes about 20 minutes a day and some people just don’t want to spend that 20 minutes meditation when a pill only takes 60 seconds.

Meditation does healing that medication can’t even begin to produce. It offers silence which helps the cells in the body heal themselves naturally especially the central nervous system. So any chemical imbalance in the body can be resolved simply by practicing inner silence. In addition, meditation allows your attention to become from forms of negative thinking which in turn allows negative thoughts to lose momentum and dissipate eventually.

Depression and anxiety can be easily reduced by combining meditation and some form of therapy whether it is a life coach, a spiritualist, a emotional wellness practitioner or a counselor, the integration of some form of talk and meditation really can reduce if not alleviate many symptoms.

You see meditation tends to focus on relaxation, concentration and awareness, and talk therapy of some sort focuses on looking at and possibly changing the emotions and beliefs that create anxiety and depression.

Only you and your doctor can decide what you need to do and when to medicate when to medicate however, if you want to use meditation and be serious about it, and use it to really cure yourself, you must be diligent. If you have to be on medication, you can still add meditation to help ease symptoms that medication simply cannot provide. The key here is to do meditation and for at least 20 minutes a day, and you have to believe, you are worth that 20 minutes a day.